Canadian Women's Foundation - Hayden

Category: Women’s poverty

Here’s How Wrap-Around Supports Can Help Close the Gender Pay Gap

A woman with red hair stands in front of a moving train.

The past year has seen several crucial moves toward closing the gender pay gap in Canada. The promised proactive pay equity legislation for federal workers, Ontario passed  legislation in April, and  have begun to equalize their gender pay differences. While all of these are important steps in making the pay gap a thing of the […]

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A Deficit Worth Worrying About: The Gendered And Racialized Wage Gap

blog Median Employment Incomes

I was really hoping the recent release of Census data would bring good news: wage gap closed! Racial discrimination gone! Equality achieved!

Not so much.

Gaps in pay for women and racialized groups persist. Ditto for immigrants and Indigenous peoples.

Consider Toronto, Canada’s largest city and one of its most diverse. More than half of Toronto’s population are immigrants. Exactly 50 per cent of the city’s population identifies as a visible minority. Maybe in the next Census, Statistics Canada will swap “visible minority” for “racialized,” seeing as 50 per cent is not a minority.

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Addressing Gender-Based Violence Helps Close the Gender Pay Gap

Gender Based violence and Gender wage gap

In 2017, women changed the political landscape. Individually and collectively, women asserted their equality rights by publicly naming, shaming and demanding accountability for sexual harassment and sexual assault in the workplace. As we mark the 16 Days of Global Activism Against Gender-Based Violence – the days from November’s International Day to Eliminate Violence Against Women […]

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Two Steps Forward

Thousands of women in Canada—many of them single mothers—live on the financial brink, trapped in a constant cycle of ‘one step forward, two steps back.’ Customized supports can help them get unstuck.

This story was originally published in the Spring 2015 issue of SHE Magazine. 

FOR YEARS, KRISTIN LUDLOW went from one low-paying job to another. She wanted more for herself: stability, financial independence, and work she cared about.

By the time she heard about the Women in Skilled Trades program in Burlington, she was in serious debt and had no savings. She successfully applied to the 29-week program but still struggled to make ends meet, even though the tuition was covered by the government.

Luckily for Kristin, the Women in Skilled Trades program included something special: an allowance to buy tools, work wear, and safety equipment. Without this extra support, she may not have been able to buy the tools that allowed her to find a job after graduation.

Over 1.5 million women in Canada live in poverty. Most, like Kristin, are working but earning low wages. “Just because you have a job and work 40 hours a week, doesn’t mean you’re going to get out of poverty,” says Ellen Faraday, a coordinator for the Women in Skilled Trades program.

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