Canadian Women's Foundation - Hayden

Category: Uncategorized

When it Comes to Toxic Masculinity, We All Lose

blog #MeToo

Roxane Gay, an acclaimed feminist author, wrote an essay titled “This is How We All Lose.” Her essay dissects the way society currently talks about gender equality as if it were a zero-sum game: “if women’s fortunes improve, it must mean men’s fortunes will suffer.” As Gay describes it, the catchy saying “men are from […]

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How Gender-Based Violence Impacts Mental Health

Gender Based Violence Web Feature Graphic

There is no question: Violence affects mental health. In fact, the World Health Organization and the Public Health Agency of Canada have both recognized gender-based violence as a significant public health issue

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Backlash & The Myth of Acceptance

This post was originally published on Julie S. Lalonde’s blog, Yellow Manteau.

I talk for a living.

I wear many hats in my day-to-day, but I get paid to talk and in particular, as a public educator. I visit communities, elementary schools, high schools, campuses, military bases, faith groups, various workplaces and everything in between to talk sexual violence, bystander intervention and community support.

I’ve worked in this field for over a decade.

In that time, I’ve given literally hundreds of workshops, lectures, presentations and spoken on panels.

I’m a busy bee.

There appears to be a lot of mythology around the work I do and in particular, the reception I get. There’s this idea that everywhere I go is a giant love-in. Maybe it’s because my work is so visible in the media or because I have a lot of followers on Twitter or because I’ve won awards. Or maybe it’s part of some right-wing conspiracy that the world is super feminist and misandrist. Je ne sais pas.

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Lynn Gehl on Sex Discrimination in the Indian Act

Lynn Gehl

 

INAC's Unstated Paternity Policy and 6(1)a All the Way

From 1876 through 1985, when a woman registered as a status Indian married a white man, she and their children were denied Indian status registration; at the same time, when a man registered as a status Indian married a white woman, he could pass on status registration to her and their children.

In 1985, the Indian Act was amended to remove this sex discrimination. The argument was that this legislative remedy would bring the Indian Act in line with section 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. However, these changes have come under criticism. Indigenous advocates have pointed out that sex discrimination continues through the second-generation cut-off rule and the way it is applied faster to re-instated Indian women and their children born before 1985. Further, a new form of sex discrimination was created known as “unknown and unstated paternity” – when a father did not sign his child’s birth certificate, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) assumed he was a non-Indian man.

You can learn more about the barriers the Act perpetuates here.

Lynn Gehl, Ph.D., is an Algonquin Anishinaabe-kwe advocate, artist, and writer. She’s spent more than 30 years working on a Charter challenge regarding sex discrimination in the Indian Act as it relates to INAC’s unstated paternity policy. Lynn was denied status because her paternal grandfather is unknown. In April 2017, Lynn was granted the lesser form of status known as 6(2) registration. We spoke to Lynn about her court challenge.

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