octobre 18, 2017 - by Stacey Rodas
 
This post has been lightly edited; it was originally published on Canadian Museum for Human Rights' blog.
 
A photo from the REDress Project
 
Last year (2016) marked a century since some women in Canada first got the right to vote.

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights shares the stories of many women in Canada who have fought for human rights. Some of them are very well-known, like Buffy Sainte Marie and Malala Yousafzai (an honourary Canadian citizen), while others aren’t as famous but really should be. This post, being republished today on Persons' Day during Women's History Month, is all about these lesser-known women – women who should be household names in Canada.

 
octobre 11, 2017 - by Paulette Senior

I was 11 years old when I lost my self-esteem.

I had just moved to Canada from Jamaica. Struggling with culture shock and a new school – not to mention the uncertainty of pre-teen girlhood – I desperately needed a mentor, a strong role model who believed in me. Instead, my teacher at the time decided that I was neither bright, nor capable. 

The damage to my self-esteem from that judgment has taken a lifetime to overcome – to remember who I am, and what I can do.

Yet I’m thankful for that experience because it ignited a life-long passion for social justice and advocating for the rights of women and girls.

octobre 3, 2017 - by Diane Hill

This story was originally published in the Fall 2014 issue of SHE Magazine.

Noushy Tavassoli

I am an architect and defied the stereotype that an immigrant woman can’t be successful in this male dominated world. It was hard to gain credibility and respect. I only would get jobs that used half my skills, so I worked to get accreditations that only a few people have in Canada. Today I work with the same men that openly said I wouldn’t make it. But I did—because I always believed in myself!

Rebecca Hare

People assume I am a ‘girly girl’ because I usually wear dresses or skirts to the office. In reality, I play soccer, run half-marathons, and watch way too much sports on TV. The highlight of my year is my annual March Madness trip. I wear skirts because I HATE shopping and can never find pants that fit. I always enjoy that moment when people finally get to know me and say “Oh, wow, you’re not at all who I thought you would be.” Exactly.

septembre 26, 2017 - by Sarah Kaplan

A 2015 study found that there were more CEOs of S&P 1500 companies named John or David than there were women in the U.S. What can be done to get more women in upper management or on boards of big companies? And how can we ensure they’re getting equal pay to their male counterparts?

Sarah Kaplan has a few ideas.

Kaplan is the Director of the Institute for Gender and the Economy, a Distinguished Professor of Gender and the Economy, and Professor of Strategic Management at the Rotman School of Management.

We spoke to her about the work being done at the Institute, gender wage gap myths, and how the western world’s emphasis on talent and skill leaves privilege in the workplace unchecked.  

septembre 14, 2017 - by Fay Faraday

The fall equinox on September 22 marks the point in our journey around the sun when day and night are roughly equal.

But with about 30% of the year remaining, it’s also a date to mark a disturbing inequality. For women, this marks “Now You’re Working for Free Day.”

On average, women face a gender pay gap of 30%. The impact of that gap is as if women continued to work from now – mid-September – to the end of the year with no pay at all while men received their full pay. Every year. For their whole career.

While sex discrimination in pay has been prohibited by law for decades, it persists. The gender pay gap remains a human rights crisis that impoverishes women across Canada.

septembre 14, 2017 - by Carly Friesen - 2 Comments

As a grade 12 student, I can clearly remember the stress of having to decide where I was going to apply to university. Would I apply to schools close to home, or to schools far away? Maybe even outside of Canada? It was a busy time, but one area in which I didn’t have any stress was what major I was going to apply for. I knew very clearly that I was going to study engineering.

You see, I had been told since I was young that I’m good at math and science, and therefore, I should go into a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) related field. I took great pride in the fact that I planned to study engineering. However, there was a negative side to this STEM encouragement. The praise for my early success with math and science courses often went so far as to mock those who excelled in English, sociology, or art.

septembre 11, 2017 - by Anjulie

Yes, Anjulie is a Juno-award-winning, platinum-selling songwriter and producer. It’s true that she’s worked with stars like Nicki Minaj, Icona Pop, Kelly Clarkson, Diplo, Zedd, Boombox Cartel and Benny Benassi. But when she was younger, she went through back to school jitters just like many other young girls may be experiencing this month. Now she wants to share what helped her in the hopes that it helps another young girl feel confident inside and outside the classroom!

Make Friends with People in Different Groups and Grades

One thing that was good about not being a popular girl in high school was that I had to be more creative with my friendships. Instead of trying to fit in with people who weren’t awesome enough to want to hang out with me, I found people that had common interests in other areas like the chess club, drill practice, and student council. The more motley your crew, the better you’ll be at making friends as you grow.