November 22, 2016 - by Amy Williams - 1 Comments

Women in office meetingRegardless of what’s going on in your personal life or what career path you have chosen, there is one skill that all people need to master: negotiating. Skilled negotiators are able to collaboratively solve problems and move ahead in their careers, so why aren’t women engaging in more negotiations? Fear.

According to Salary.com, 55% of women are nervous about entering negotiations, compared to only 39% of men. Women who choose to negotiate are often viewed as difficult to work with, or less feminine than other women who chose to accept what was given to them without making a fuss. Other research has shown that women are viewed this way regardless of whether they entered the negotiation with a smile or aggressive attitude.

November 16, 2016 - by Stephanie Labbé

Stephanie LabbéThis summer, I had the incredible opportunity to compete in the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio as the goalkeeper for the Canadian Women’s National Soccer Team. We played with determination, belief and so much heart and pride. 

I am so proud to have won a Bronze medal for Canada after leaving everything I had on the field. Going into the Olympics, and throughout, I had so much confidence in myself and the team because I knew we had trained so hard and were prepared for any obstacle that would be thrown at us. 

November 15, 2016 - by Shari Graydon

Miss Triggs CartoonThis post was originally published by Informed Opinions.

You can tell how old this Punch cartoon is by the honorific applied to the sidelined “Miss” Triggs.

But sadly, even though it was first published more than half a century ago, including it in a slide deck in 2016 still elicits the laughter of recognition.

What stops you from speaking up at meetings?

November 14, 2016 - by Pamela Johnson

Jahangir SultanaThis post was originally published on the Coady International Institute’s blog.

Sultana Jahangir has seen too many educated women lose their dreams. It’s why the Bangladeshi-born founder of the South Asian Women’s Rights Organization (SAWRO) in Toronto is laser-focused when persuading politicians and bureaucrats to do the right thing.

“Two out of three women who use our services have a master's degree, but have trouble finding work,” she says.

November 9, 2016 - by Jessica Howard

Woman smilingWhen you think of leaders you admire, what are their qualities? Perhaps they fearlessly speak their minds, or inspire others by setting a powerful example.

The good news is that you can develop these skills on your own. And there’s no need to wait for a promotion at work to get started. Getting involved social change is a fantastic way to practice leadership skills.

How? When it comes to gender equality, we have a few ideas for how you can lead for change:

November 2, 2016 - by Jessica Howard

ShaneenIn high school, Shaneen Cotterell signed up for ReAct: Respect in Action, a violence prevention program that stoked her interest in social justice. As told to Jessica Howard.

In grade 11, my social science teacher suggested I try the ReAct after-school program, because she knew I was interested in the issues it covered. When I saw that the program talked about things like oppression, gender stereotypes, abuse, and healthy relationships, I signed up and stayed involved through Grades 11 and 12.

November 2, 2016 - by Jessica Howard

Young woman in officeDo you do backflips when you hear the word “leadership”?

Does your inner critic tell you you’re just not cut out for it? That you simply don’t have the experience needed and aren’t in any position to tell others what to do?  

But what if being a great leader isn’t about having all the answers or always being in control? What if it’s about listening and collaborating? Working through networks instead of hierarchies?