May 9, 2017 - by Haydee

7.4 billion is the annual estimated cost of spousal violence in Canada

As part of the Foundation’s annual Campaign to End Violence, we’re asking Canadians to make a donation and send a message of support to women in shelters. It was the support and encouragement of others that helped Haydee rebuild her life after experiencing violence many years ago. In today’s blog post, Haydee shares some of her story and reflects on what she would say to her younger self.
 
Years ago, I was living in isolation land. I had made the difficult decision to take my daughter and leave an abusive relationship, with only a small suitcase and a few family photos in hand.
 
April 28, 2017 - by Jessica Howard

7 in 10 people who experience family violence are women and girlsWhen Haydee made the heart-wrenching decision to leave an abusive relationship, she felt “alone on a life raft, in the middle of a dark ocean.”

With the help of counselling and encouragement from others, she and her daughter began rebuilding their lives.

“That feeling (of support) fuelled my courage and strengthened my determination to start anew.”

What can you do to support women who have experienced violence?

April 13, 2017 - by Jessica Howard

Kathy Tuccaro with her truckKathy Tuccaro never pictured herself as a heavy equipment operator, but a skilled trades program at Women Building Futures helped her take her life in a new direction.

AT JUST SEVEN years old, Kathy Tuccaro started running away from home.

She says she was first molested as a young child living in foster care, and continued to experience verbal, physical, and sexual abuse during her childhood, as well as throughout her adulthood life.

She went on to have a daughter and become a nurse, but was haunted by her past. She struggled with self-harm, toxic relationships, and alcoholism.

April 11, 2017 - by Jessica Howard

Wage Gap StatisticAre you seeing red today? If so, that’s a good thing!

It’s Equal Pay Day, and the Ontario Equal Pay Coalition is calling on people to wear red to acknowledge that women are still “in the red” due to the gender wage gap.

Equal Pay Day marks the date that represents how far into this calendar year women must work to earn what men did in the last year. When you account for the gender wage gap, a woman in Ontario would have to work 15.5 months to earn what men earn in 12 months. That brings us to early April.

April 6, 2017 - by Kate McInturff - 1 Comments

Woman in officeThis post was originally published on the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ blog Behind the Numbers.

The wage gap is pretty easy to understand. I do a job. You do a job. I get paid more. You get paid less. Unfair. Especially if you and I have the same training, work the same hours, and perform the same kind of tasks. And yet, the gender wage gap persists, right here in Canada, even when education, occupation, experience, and hours of work are considered. The gap is even bigger for Indigenous women, racialized women, immigrant women, and women with disabilities.

April 4, 2017 - by Sara and Vanessa

Girl in Park

This is the fifth post in the Confidence Stories series in partnership with Always®. Confidence Stories features stories, tips and ideas to support girls, build their confidence and encourage them to Keep Playing #LikeAGirl.

Through the support of generous donors like Always, we are able help more than 1,000 girls in 44 communities to participate in programs that engage their bodies, minds and spirits.

Vanessa and I are in craft room 2 at Guildford Recreation Centre. We have our Girls Got Game sign on the door so that parents know which room we are in today. There are snacks, table activities and small classroom games ready for the girls, and as they enter the room, we hear laughter, chit-chat, and questions about what we are going to do today, as well as what snacks we’ll be having!

March 20, 2017 - by Aimee Louw
Young couple on a date
Ableism can be defined as systemic discrimination based on disability. You know, those encounters you have that make you feel bad about your disability, or those barriers that prevent you from having your needs or desires met.
 
Ableism shows up everywhere. And for women or femmes or gender non-binary people, sometimes it's hard to pinpoint whether it's misogyny, ableism, or a gnarly combination. 
 
So how does ableism enter the dating world?